Our Services

Please note: Australian Firearms Regulations are different in every State, and Regulations can be changed from time to time (sometimes without adequate public notice). 

The following information is a general guide only, and should not be solely relied upon to make decisions. Please check with your State’s Firearms Registry before proceeding with advice given on this page.

NSW residents can also contact LSAFM to check on the currency of the advice below.

The following information is current to March 2019 for NSW, Australia.


LSAFM has an in-house Firearms Dealer who can provide the following services for other museums and the general public.

We can assist with transfer of ownership, dealing with firearms in a deceased estate, and disposal of unwanted firearms.  Talk to us if you are considering donating your firearms.

We also give advice on safe storage, identification of firearms, and displaying firearms in museums.

If a firearm is not registered please see this section.

If your firearms related issue is not listed, contact us for advice.


Transfer of ownership of a firearm

Note: Information in this section applies to NSW only. Contact Firearms Registry in your state for advice.

In order for a transfer of ownership of a registerable firearm to take place, the transaction must be conducted by a registered Firearms Dealer.

The recipient must obtain a Permit To Acquire (PTA) from NSW Firearms Registry. An application for a PTA can be made online at Firearms Registry’s website, or by phoning them.

There are two ways of doing transfer of ownership depending on the circumstances.

  1. If you need time to get a Permit to Acquire (PTA), or have other problems, eg a license expires before a transfer can take place, we will transfer your firearms onto our Dealer’s books and hold them in safe storage until you get a Permit to Acquire.
  2. If all requirements are in place, both owner and buyer need to bring the firearm into the Museum with the registration certificate, the PTA, and the appropriate licenses of both parties. (Any firearms brought into the Museum must be covered and not in public view.)

Contact the LSAFM to make an appointment or for further information.

We charge a small fee to conduct transfers.


Unregistered firearms

Note: Information in this section applies to NSW only. Contact the Firearms Registry in your state for advice.

Since the 2018 NSW Firearms Amnesty, it is very difficult to register an unregistered firearm. The Registry requirement, at present, is for any unregistered firearm to surrendered to the Police. From there they are sent to the Weapons Disposal section.

If you wish to keep and register the firearm you must apply for a Court Order under Section 80 of the NSW Firearms Act.


Firearms in deceased estates

Note: Information in this section applies to NSW only. If you are administering a Will in another State contact Firearms Registry in your state for advice.

Some antique firearms don’t require registration, and in this case they can be distributed or kept by the Executor of the Will without complications. They must, however, still comply with safe storage requirements.

If you need advice on the Category of the firearm, contact Firearms Registry in your State. LSAFM can also provide this advice for firearms in NSW.

For firearms that require registration, the Executor of the Will has six months to do one of the following with a registered firearm:

  • Transfer the firearm registration into their own name;
  • Transfer the firearm to a person nominated in the will or another person nominated by the Executor;
  • Dispose of the firearm by giving it to a dealer to sell, with proceeds going back to the Estate;
  • Dispose of the firearm to the Police for destruction; or,
  • Donate the firearm to a museum or similar organisation.

While a firearm is in the hands of an executor it must be kept in safe storage as specified by the Firearms Registry in your State.

If a firearm in a deceased estate is found to be unregistered, it must be immediately surrendered to the Police. If you wish to keep the firearm you must apply for a Court Order.

NSW Firearms Registry website has a fact sheet on firearms in deceased estates.


Disposal of unwanted firearms

Note: Information in this section applies to NSW only. Contact Firearms Registry in your state for advice.

If you wish to dispose of a unwanted firearm that is unregistered, but is of a Category that should be registered, you must surrender it to the Police.

If you need advice on the Category of the firearm, contact Firearms Registry in your State. LSAFM can also provide this advice for firearms in NSW.

Registered firearms can be disposed of by one of the following methods:

  • Sell or give the firearm to another licensed owner. (Transfer must take place through a dealer);
  • Dispose of the firearm by giving it to a dealer to sell on your behalf;
  • Sell the firearm to a Firearms Dealer;
  • Donate the firearm to a museum or similar organisation; or,
  • Surrender to the Police for destruction


Identification of firearms

We are happy to help those who are truly perplexed, however, we receive many requests of this nature, so if it is possible for you to do your own research, please do so before contacting us.

In some cases we will be able to help with firearms identification by description only. In other cases, photographs will be required.

It is best to first contact us with a description of the firearm and its markings, including the serial number. If we need further information or photographs we will let you know.

If we require photographs to properly identify the firearm, we will generally need an overall photograph of the firearm and clear pictures of its markings.

We receive many requests for the history of Lithgow made Lee Enfield (SMLE) rifles. The Factory kept no records of these rifles after they left store so we cannot assist with these enquiries. This fact sheet explains many of the markings found on the rifles, which can give you some indication of their history.